Advent · Advice for Women · Andshelaughs · andshelaughs writing · Art of LIving · Career · Christmas · Creative Life · Creative Writing · Creativity · Fearless Living · Friendship · Graceful Living · Gracious Living · Healthy Living · Hope · Inspiration · Joyful Living · Life · Life Lessons · Lifestyle · Living · Meaning of Life · Midlife · Mindful Living · Motivation · Professional Women · Relationships · Religion and Spirituality · Simple Living · Spiritual Living · Spirituality · The Art of Living · Uncategorized · Whole Living · women · Women's Issues · Wonder · Working Women · Writing Inspiration

Connection: Wonder in the Darkness

candle in snowIt’s that feeling when you receive an email from the person you’re thinking of at the same time as you press send on your email to them.

Synchronicity takes faith. It’s that feeling of floating above it all where everything and everyone just clicks.  My life is abundant with that…mostly.

We’re coming to the end of another year. January 1st can be a pretty important mental reset date.  Goal setting, resolutions and check-lists for the year ahead.

This year I set some pretty great goals. I met most of them. What I learned this year was way more important than checking off a list though. I learned what traps my energy and keeps me from feeling that satisfying peace of synchronicity. Now that I’ve identified it, I can do something about it.

That’s power my friends. That’s joy-brimming, creative-muscle-flexing power! It makes me giddy, and hopeful, and snuffs out the candle of despair which so easily ignites when we totter off balance.

I always save vacation time for the Christmas season. I enjoy the nesting of this holiday; baking, cooking, gift making, cocoa-sipping, movie watching, cocktails with friends, and making time for the coffee dates we put off all year long.

I also really dig Advent. I fully subscribe to the mystery of Advent, the idea of light in the darkness, and rebirth via struggle. But not too much struggle. Not struggle for struggle’s sake. I don’t dig unnecessary suffering, even as an artist.

Synonyms for ADVENT ˈæd vɛnt
  • advent, coming(noun) arrival that has been awaited (especially of something momentous) …

  • Advent(noun) the season including the four Sundays preceding Christmas. …

This holiday season, weather you celebrate Christmas or not, the darkest days of the year lend themselves to introspection, to wonder, to being open to new, yet-to-be-revealed opportunities. I hope that during this time you take the solitude you need to rest, reflect and connect.

cocoa with friends

It is through connection that I hope to reign in the things that deplete my energy.  It is through connection that I hope to ignite what brings me vitality. It is through connection that I hope to contribute to the world around me through my relationships, profession and creative pursuits.

I urge you to reflect on any feeling that tugs away at your soul and needs attention. And then connect with people whose presence alone will help heal those attention seeking areas of your life.  I hope that you connect with people who help you feel joyful, powerful and positive.

 

 

Uncategorized

Christmas in New York: Part 3

Everyone knows about the Tree at Rockafeller Center, and everyone should see it.  Ditto for all of the store windows on Fifth Avenue. You’re going to hear about the best cocktail in town too…the Fever Tree Porch at Bryant Park.

Trying to squeeze my way back on to the street, away from the crowds at Bryant Park, I heard a little voice say, “Mom, can I have a Rolex?” It was at once hilarious ( no kid, you cannot have a Rolex, but here’s a free candy cane), and heartbreaking.

As an adult, I’ve come to love the spirit of Christmas; the gathering with friends and family. The beauty of decorations, and care put into them. I love taking time to pause and to donate to my regular charities. It’s easy to forget that for a lot of adults they never lose the I-want spoiled consumerism that goes hand in hand with the season.  The mystery of advent is lost on so many.

It’s easy to understand how the beautiful gift of hope; light in the darkness goes hand in hand with the human condition of suffering. The crowds on Canal street bent over sorting through knock off bags ceremoniously laid out on garbage bags, and bargaining in all of the souvenir stores for the same scarves, costume jewelry is the underbelly of all of the sparkle. Go for a look but don’t mark it as part of your Christmas in New York City. Mark it as a way to remind yourself of how fortunate you are, and that really, very few of us have true need at Christmas.  Let Canal street and the packed shops remind you to give this Christmas season.

Once you’ve reminded yourself how fortunate you are, how badly the planet needs you not to consume, get on with enjoying the spirit of the sparkle.

Speaking of sparkle, the Saks light display was a complete surprise. I mean, was my head under a rock when I planned our Chritsmas in New York Extravaganza? It wasn’t on the books.  And that’s one of the reasons why I would absolutely recommend Free Tours by Foot.   Our tour guide was John, and he was five stars. Although the tour cost a mere $3.00 (which was actually donation to a toy drive), prepare to leave a big, fat tip at the end of the tour because you’re going to be that impressed.

 

Bryant Park Winter Village is just what it is – a Christmas market. If you’re into hand-crafted unique gifts, it’s a great place to shop. Keep in mind you’ll be on the equivalent of a conveyer belt of people, jostling just to take a step.

What I loved most about the park was that you could skate for free (if you brought your own skates), and they squeezed the Fever Tree Porch into the corner of 40th Street and Avenue of the Americas/6th Ave. It’s a little respite in the middle of the NYC madness. It took less than ten minutes to be seated (table for five), and the atmosphere was cozy. Picture a fully stocked bar with two warm bonfires out front for the standing room only folks, and outdoor heaters for those of us who needed a minute off our feet and a seat at a table. I recommend the Hot Penicillin (cider with whiskey, lemon and honey), and the chili. Scroll down and I’ll give you the recipe.

Oh, plan your bathroom route too. Most places have at least a 30 minute wait for the toilets. Stay hydrated and cocktail wisely my friends.

Map everything in advance. It doesn’t take a genius to map the grid system in uptown, but it takes a little more Lewis-and-Clarking to get around old downtown. The subway in New York was designed for you to desire to get quickly from A to B. The NYC Subway app comes in handy for delays and closures. In the summer if it’s the sweltering heat underground that makes you want o surface, at Christmas time, it’s surely the juried musicians. They’re the worst gawd-awful musicians I’ve ever heard. It’s like the musicians stole all of the grit of the Grinch at his grinchiest, and force it upon you like military orders.  Run.

Despite the terrible noise in the subway, New York City at Christmas time is beautiful. The compact layout all decked out in lights is beautiful. Everything twinkles and for the most part, everyone there (tourists) is in a good mood.

Central Park is always a highlight, and the little zoo is no exception with their outdoor exhibits during the holidays. It was a great Sunday morning start, and included a 4D Polar Express showing. Definitely worth checking out to make you feel like a kid again.

 

And speaking of feeling like a kid again, who really doesn’t enjoy a giant toy store filled with amazing hands-on displays? I hit FAO Schwarzin the evening. I was only the third person in line to get in. Just a little tip, the line up to get in is at the rear of the Christmas Tree at Rockafeller Center, and a great way to get close to the tree without the crowds…during the later evening anyway.

Yes I did play the giant piano, and scooted around the store like a giant kid until I was sweaty and tired, and ready to head out onto the street, whining that I needed a drink of water. What you need to do is make sure you have metro pass fully loaded to zip around the city.  What you’re also going to need is at least one pair of  really, really, really comfortable shoes. Cocktail stops are a must, and don’t plan on going anywhere for lunch or dinner without reservations.  In fact, the more popular spots require planning up to three months ahead of time. Do your restaurant research. I’m also a fan of ordering in after a looooooong day of touristing so I can eat all tucked in, freshly showered, and ready to snuggle in for a dreamy sleep.

Christmas has not always been a merry time for me. Like anyone else, I’ve experienced heartbreak, grief and loads of stress during the holidays. But not this year. And so I’m enjoying it without reserve. The pendulum of life keeps swinging, and we all take a turn at the ups and downs. If you are having an up and you love Christmas, I highly recommend New York as a destination. I took four days and wished I had a fifth to finish off my list of must-see’s-and-do’s.  Which is a blessing in disguise because now I must return again another year.

 

Andshelaughs · Christmas · Christmas Lists · Christmas Marketing · Holidays · New York City · New York City Travel · Things to Do in NYC Christmas · Travel · Travel Writing · Uncategorized

Christmas in New York: Part 2

img_5044

In Christmas Part 1, I gave you a brief summary of our itinerary and slagged the possibility of contracting something awful from the subway.

In this instalment of the wonderful Christmasy world of New York,  I’m going to talk about my experience at Rolf’s restaurant and Paddy Maquire’s Ale House.

First of all, let’s talk about Rolf’s. it’s as over-the-top as you imagine. I mean, take a look at this;

 

This was my first and last Christmas trip to Rolf’s. It was one of those destinations that leave you feeling glad you did it once, but a little deflated at the same time.  The mass of decorations in photos like I’m sharing with you here give the impression that the restaurant is big enough to accommodate crowds. It is not.  It’s a tiny little space like all of the other tiny little spaces in NYC.

When I made my reservation ( in September ), I was told that each person dining MUST order an entree, and that seatings were only for one hour. Considering each meal is big enough to serve at least two people, you can’t complain about the cost. Ridiculously large, isn’t really my style. If you go and don’t order the potato pancakes, what’s really the point? And the black forest cake. If you’re gonna do it, so it right, right?

No wine list offered, but $18.00 for a 5oz glass of house plonk, really is gouging. The heat generated from all of the guests crammed uncomfortably close under a zillion lights made the hour-long giant meal uncomfortable at best.

If you want to see Rolf’s, save yourself a load of cash, and line up first thing in the morning to get into the bar area for a drink. They seat you so tightly, that standing shoulder to shoulder while sipping an overpriced Christmas cocktail seems to be the best

choice to observe this NYC Christmas landmark.

Just down the street is Paddy Maguire’s Ale House.  I happened upon this gem while waiting for my table at Rolf’s.

img_5322-e1576349417584.png

I have to admit that I’m a pub girl. Irish blood runs in these veins, and there’s nothing like a good pour at an Irish pub to warm  you up from the inside out. Plus, there are always friendly regulars.

Drinks were reasonable, service was excellent, and the decorations were both bountiful and welcoming.

img_5049.jpgimg_5049.jpgimg_5057

 

If you ever find yourself lucky enough to be in the city during the holidays, Rolf’s and Paddy Maguire’s are both a must see.  Although I appreciate the effort, and commitment to wowing the Christmas crowd’s at Rolf’s, it definitely costs. It’s a one-time-visit versus a multi-visit-I-wish-I-lived-close-enought-to-be-a-regular at Paddy Maquire’s.

The rest of the NYC Christmas Extravaganza can be found here.

Christmas · Christmas Lists · International Travel · New York City · New York City Travel · Things to Do in NYC Christmas · Travel · Travel Advice · Travel Writers · Uncategorized

Christmas in New York: Part 1

Trish Taking Pic of Tree

That’s a picture of me taking a picture of ‘THE TREE’.  Photo credit to my friend Bobby who made his way from Queens for a visit in Bryant Park, and then hung in for a walking tour which pitched us down the heralding-angeled-chute of Rockafeller Centre toward the big tree.

My sweetie referred to the crowd gathered as a cult, and almost went into full drowning-panic mode trying to get the hell out of our North American Christmas mecca.

As I write this, I’m watching, “Extreme Christmas Trees”. My gifts are already wrapped, and I’m feeling full-on-merry.  I think that visiting New York City last week has a lot to do with it.

Our first stop was at Bryant Park to meet up with friends. It was also adjacent to the New York City Library where our evening tour of the famous store windows would start.   I ‘do‘ Christmas every year. Always have, always will.

The Macy’s windows this year brought tears to my eyes. On one side of the building, they told the story of Virginia O’Hanlon. I’m named after Virginia O’Hanlonwho wrote the famed response from the editor of the New York Sun that, “Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus”.  Be prepared for a story if you ask me why then, is my name not Virginia…it’s a long story that involves genetics predisposed to alcoholism and shenanigans.

The Sak’s light display was breathtaking, and the Bergdorf Windows were over-the-top.  We visited the plaza hotel, had a carriage ride through Central Park,and made it (unwittingly) in to the middle of the memorial of the 39th anniversary of John Lennon’s death in the Strawberry Fields at Central Park, across from the Dakota hotel. I tried to spot Yoko, but it ‘was dark,and everyone was bundled up.

We ate at Rolf’s, walked our asses off and got the requisite photos at Radio City Music Hall and in front of the giant, red balls in the Chase fountain.  We shopped on Canal street. It really is the giant, dirty heart of the consumer beast that has ruined our civilization…I managed to score a few bargains, and question my own ethics as a consumer.  I bought a knock-off, got my aura photographed and read (dead on by the way, and totally worth the thirty bucks. Magic Jewelry is truly a ‘hidden’ gem and a bastion of tranquility within the hustle and bustle of NYC).

Mulberry Street in Little Italy is a pocket of lights and merriment. Street vendors offer mouth-watering roasted nuts, fresh nougat, and cannoli. And by the time you make to all of these places, your immune system will be either fortified or completely destroyed by the subway system, and your feet will be wrecked.

But it’s all worth it.  At least once.

Let me tell you about Rolf’s.

Advice · Andshelaughs · Art of LIving · Christmas · Christmas Baking · Fearless Living · Graceful Living · Gratitude · Happiness Project · Healthy Living · Holidays · Joyful Living · Living · Marriage · Mature Dating · Meaning of Christmas · Meaning of Life · Mental Health · Middle Age · Midlife · Relationships · The Art of Living · Travel · Uncategorized · Weddings · Wednesday Wisdom

Christmas Is:One Part of a Busy Life

Champagne TowerMy fiance was not prepared for this. After putting a two-and-a-half carat ring on my finger and whisking me away on a romantic vacation, he had the strange idea that I’d just keep staring at the ring, and not dotting the I’s and crossing the T’s of venue and vendor contracts.

It’s just my nature.

We’ve both been drinking more.  In fact, I’m currently out of red wine and praying that when he rolls in from the gym that he has a ginormous brown bag under his arm disguising a big, juicy bottle or two from California. Preferably a gulpable blend of cab, shiraz, and maybe a splash of merlot. I’m not fussy, but I am a lush.

My eyes are strained from computer use. Pinterest and custom stationary sites have me stuck to my laptop.  My sweetie is looking for his cheque book to avoid ridiculous credit card fees. My son’s girlfriend who is a touch more au courant than this old gal has been indispensable when it comes to sourcing make-up artists, photographers and dresses. She’s humouring me, and winning a crazy amount of mom-points.

I’m not sure she was counting on an almost-in-law who had a penchant for sequins, pearls and ostrich feathers though.  I’m sure she cringes at the dresses I send to her, hoping she might wiggle into one and hop on the bandwagon of glitter and shimmy.

On top of wanting to have all the big items booked for the big day, I have two major holidays coming up before Christmas, and a major surgery to get through. All of this in less than two months.

He’ll be on wine duty, so long as I take care of all of the other details. And that makes the relationship work.

I spent the entire day fussing over wedding details while baking Christmas treats to take to our Christmas at the Cottage family getaway.  And then my sweetie texted requesting our Christmas in New York Extravaganza itinerary.

I’m a planner by nature. As a funeral director, I’m basically an event planner on a turbo-charged schedule who can pass top level anatomical dissection, pathology, microbiology, and chemistry while wearing two-inch heals, an ugly uniform and an empathetic smile.

rolfs

As the full time vacation planner in the relationship, I have our itineraries researched and down to the nearest metro stop, secluded cenote, and best time not to be in a line-up for too long. I lassoed reservations in September for hard to get into NYC restaurants during the Christmas season, tickets to the Fort Worth Rodeo between football games, and a first day in France schedule that brought my sweetie up from our first metro stop to the best view in the city.  I plan shit. That’s what I do.

Weddings on the other hand aren’t something I’m too familiar with.  I’ve never been a wedding person. I’ve alway been a party-girl though, so I’m taking that approach.  And fabulous parties take planning.

From the language on the invitation to the details of decor, every element of a great party has to be dazzling. It has to be dedicated to a theme, delicious, boozy, artistically lit, most of all, welcoming for everyone. If all else fails, we’re starting with champagne reception and having an open bar…how bad can it be?

In the mean time, there are gifts to wrap, passports to find, bags to pack, unpack, and pack again, treats to bake, and weight to lose. Seriously.

If, like me, you have a lot on your plate this year during the holidays, I wish you some quiet moments to appreciate everything that’s good in your life.

 

Baking · Christmas · Christmas Baking · Christmas Cookies · Christmas Gift Ideas · Christmas Recipes · Cooking · Holidays · Midlife · Nostalgia · Recipes · Uncategorized

Christmas is: Opening the Recipe Box

Christmas cookies coffee decorations vintageGloria Wilson’s Hamburger Casserole, Barb & Dwight’s Slitherdown, Great-Great-Granny’s Chili Sauce, Janny Pinksen’s Christmas Fruitcake….

This is how the majority of my recipes in my recipe box are organized. Yes, I still have a recipe box. No, I don’t still have a rotary phone.

When I grew up every respected mom in the village where I grew up, had a recipe box that was well-loved and packed full of their family recipes. Quite often those recipes were closely guarded, not given out, and used as a bartering tool for status at community pot-lucks.  Let’s face it, in a town of 500, you had to use whatever you could for leverage. Often it was a pickle recipe, or some sort of exotic flavoured square. Pineapple for instance was a rarity, and often a favourite. Flaked coconut was an extravagance.

It’s these very recipes that I try to recreate today. It’s my heritage, and I celebrate it. If you have an old recipe box packed with recipes handed down to you by loving friends and relatives, you know what I mean. If you don’t, this is your chance to get in on some  5th & 6th generation Canadian Christmas baking.

Some of our family favourites include;

Butterscotch Marshmallow Squares

Whipped Shortbread with Toblerone

Great-Granny’s Coconut Cherry Balls

recipe box

It’s that time of year when a fun tray of cookies and squares can spark a happy memory for many of us.  Despite a number of years where grief was heavy in my heart during the holidays, being able to recreate recipes from my childhood kept a little spark of Christmas magic alive while I healed.

Now that I have my own home and family, I take my job as Mrs. Claus very seriously, and I hope that every time my kiddo walks through the door from now until the end of December, he still feels some of the magic of the season, even if it comes in small bites from his favourite shortbread.

I can only hope that you feel a little bit of joy serving up some of the recipes that I’m going to share with you this Christmas season.

 

Andshelaughs · Baking · Christmas · Christmas Baking · Christmas Cookies · Christmas Gift Ideas · Christmas Lists · Christmas Recipes · Christmas Toronto · Cooking · Meaning of Christmas · Recipes · Simple Living · Uncategorized

Christmas is: Sharing

I have a few closely guarded secret recipes that are standards at our house. The, “It wouldn’t be Christmas without these mom”, kind-of-recipes.

Cookies are my thing, and I make a lot of them at Christmas time. I love the way that fancy sugar cookies look added to a tray of down-home-country-girl sweets. The little maraschino cherry balls that my granny used to make melt in our mouths, but by far our favourite cookie recipe is this;

WHIPPED SHORTBREAD WITH TOBLERONE

1 lb butter at room temperature

1 cup icing sugar

1/2 cup corn starch

3 cups flour

1 tsp vanilla

Large Toblerone bar.

Cream butter on high until light and fluffy. If using a stand mixer, use the whipping attachment for this. 

While butter is being whipped, divide Toblerone into triangles and then divide those triangles into thirds. 

Combine all other ingredients and slowly add to whipped butter, using regular attachment. Be patient when mixing as this dough gets quite crumbly before coming together into a smooth dough. 

Place 1″ spoonfuls onto a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper. Press a piece of divided Toblerone into each mound of cookie dough, and top with same amount of dough. Feel free to be generous with the chocolate…just sayin’

Bake at 350 for 12-15 minutes. Do no overcook. Let cookies cool on tray before moving them to a cooling rack as they are very delicate and crumble before they cool.