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Who Said Yes?

dogslaveHead on over to @andshelaughs1 on Twitter.

I’ve retweeted a horrifying clip from the Economist. I love the Economist by the way, it’s right up there with Hallmark Christmas movies and making it to yoga class three times a week.

In my last post, I wrote to you about burnout and wished you well on your journey out of hell.  Let me assure you, that it could be worse. You could be forced to wear a device developed by Humanyze that tracks your every move and word at work. Taking it one step further, some companies are actually microchipping their employees.

Which begs the questions;

1)What fuck-wit actually thought this was a good idea?

2)What spineless turd first agreed to wear this, thus setting a precedent for all of the poor suckers who came after?

WALK UP A set of steep stairs next to a vegan Chinese restaurant in Palo Alto in Silicon Valley, and you will see the future of work, or at least one version of it. This is the local office of Humanyze, a firm that provides “people analytics”. It counts several Fortune 500 companies among its clients (though it will not say who they are). Its employees mill around an office full of sunlight and computers, as well as beacons that track their location and interactions. Everyone is wearing an ID badge the size of a credit card and the depth of a book of matches. It contains a microphone that picks up whether they are talking to one another; Bluetooth and infrared sensors to monitor where they are; and an accelerometer to record when they move.

“Every aspect of business is becoming more data-driven. There’s no reason the people side of business shouldn’t be the same,” says Ben Waber, Humanyze’s boss. The company’s staff are treated much the same way as its clients. Data from their employees’ badges are integrated with information from their e-mail and calendars to form a full picture of how they spend their time at work. Clients get to see only team-level statistics, but Humanyze’s employees can look at their own data, which include metrics such as time spent with people of the same sex, activity levels and the ratio of time spent speaking versus listening.

Taken from the Economist March 28, 2018

 

In the hands of people who stand to make the almighty dollar from tracking our every move, these devices obviously prove that hell, indeed, exists right here on earth.

As an alternative to wearing a tracking device like a dog, I suggest you take to the streets and protest our society’s obsession with automating our souls.  Seriously, the French know how to make change, and they do it loud and proud on the pavement that their taxes paid for.

microchipped

We live in a country lauded by the rest of the planet as being fabulous, yet we are apathetic to a fault. I’m sorry we’re sorry about everything. Mostly I’m sorry that it’s gotten so bad that keeping a roof over our heads stresses us out to the point of making us sick, destroying families, and leaves us feeling powerless.

Please promise me dear readers, that if you are ever asked to wear a device around your neck or to be microchipped by your employer that you not-so-politely decline. Life is too short to be treated like a commodity. I don’t care how much you need the money, freedom is priceless, humanity is sacred, and bullshit tracking devices are cluttering the planet with waste. 

 

 

 

 

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When We Lose Our Neighbours

greed economyI’ve lived here four and a half months, and said hello to exactly three neighbours. It’s amounted to a total time commitment of under 10 whole minutes. 600 seconds.

Earlier this week a news story broke about a house fire and the resulting fatalities. A single mother and two children living in a multi-family house died.  The house is  suspected to have been scraping under the radar of housing regulations, as most affordable housing does.

A neighbour was interviewed saying that he lived ‘nine-steps-away’, but had never met the family. Just nine steps.

And therein lies the problem. We no longer have a sense of community. We are no longer neighbourly. We no longer have the energy or resources to care for others.  We no longer have the inclination to take the time to build relationships with other people. Our world is losing its humanity in the great race to keep the economic machine rolling.

eat cake

Recently the raise in Ontario’s minimum wage has people divided over the benefits and drawbacks. Primarily the arguments are about the ability of businesses to ‘catch up’ and make profits. What is lacking in the conversation is what has been happening to the most vulnerable people in our communities for a very long time; decreased access to safe housing, health care, and the resulting social maladies. What is also lacking is a discussion regarding the  ridiculous wealth acquired by those who say they cannot afford to pay a fair, living wage.

The short-sighted argue that by raising minimum wage, the vulnerable will become jobless, and their situation worse. And they’re right. Unchecked greed will make all of it worse. Protesting for and protecting the vulnerable can only create a stronger community. It’s what neighbours do. It creates community. It prevents bad things from getting worse.

The word neighbour seems to be going the way of the word chesterfield. Perhaps we’re unwittingly becoming more like our neighbours to the south than we’d like to think.

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PMS? No, Just Ranting about a Greedy Corporation

kinopoisk.ru

There’s nothing like appalling customer service to get a gal looking lively.

I’d like to share a rant with you about my very own experience with Fed-Ex.

I’d like to send this post out to the wonderfully frustrating and totally incompetent folks at Fed-Ex.

First of all, let me say thank you for the multitude of voicemail messages that were left (from an international phone number to my mobile phone – morons) after you attempted to deliver a package to the wrong door.

Thank you.

Thank you for not attempting to deliver the parcel to the office, “…because [you] didn’t think they would accept it”. I’m so glad you indiscriminately used your own logic despite a detailed delivery instruction to do just that. How refreshing – independent thinkers.

I’m sure Fed-Ex is not the only inept delivery service, although this is the second time they’ve screwed up in the past few months. Previously they did not deliver a parcel to my place of business because it didn’t look like the address, despite having the street and number clearly marked on a sign by the road.

I have a feeling that what is likely happening here, and I could be wrong, is that the driver’s get paid by delivery rather than a salary or hourly rate. Why take a chance that where the customer requested the package be dropped off will actually accept said package when it would take more time? I can make a guess as to why not; they’re over-worked, underpaid, and time literally is money.

There’s so much of this ludicrously medieval hiring practice happening, that it’s ruining our social well-being, and only serving to satisfy the wealthy. Just look at the rise of luxury good sales. Which, incidentally targets a paltry percentage of the population. I’m sure the delivery lady who left a cryptic message with such a strong foreign accent that it was undecipherable, won’t be shopping for a three-thousand dollar purse this weekend.

Just a word to companies a la Fed-Ex who offer shitty customer service; treat your employees better and you’ll have more satisfied customers. Word of mouth is powerful.

Oh yah, I’ve already made arrangements to go and pick up the package myself (God forbid we ever lose door-to-door with Canada Post). So stop calling me, you incompetent morons.