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In the Kitchen With Granny

Today I woke up and took a good look in the mirror; Fingers padding lightly across my skin, as I lean in to really see myself. I look into my tired blue eyes and know that I look like both of my grandmothers.  I have the round, kind face of my Granny Dorothy, and the body of my Granny Eileen. It’ll just have to do.

The two of them were as different as night and day. Granny Dorothy was an educated woman who married late in life to a sour, strict, everyone’s-going-to-burn-in-hell-baptist.  Her wits and grit kept the bills paid, and her sense of humour kept her alive. Had she been born today, she likely never would have married. She would have worked her way around the world. Alas, the 1930’s had other plans for her.

Granny Eileen on the other hand, was on husband number three when I came along. She’d raised six kids on her own. She was a resourceful woman with a heart of gold who didn’t take a lick of shit from anyone, especially her husband.

Both of these women taught me to make something from nothing.  Whether it was in the kitchen, or out in the world at large. They taught me how a woman could be both strong and kind.

Every year, I keep them close as I plant my garden, and every harvest season, as I take to the kitchen. These rituals keep me close to them. I’m a sentimental traditionalist when it comes to my kitchen. During the summer, I find myself preserving the same things with the same recipes that they did all those years ago.  I throw in a few more odds and ends, just because I find comfort in the routine of being in the kitchen during harvest season.

This morning I slipped on a jersey knit dress that put me in mind of Granny Dorothy. She knew what she was doing with those old house dresses. Simple, tidy, and most importantly when you’re preserving; cool. I listened to interviews with authors as I sterilized jars, peeled and chopped fruit, remembering how my Granny Eileen’s gnarled up hands seemed to be able to create anything.

During the summer months, I yearn for the slow, simple days of childhood summers. I recall the flavour of each stage of the harvest; radish, carrots, and beans snapped straight from the plant and tossed directly into our mouths.  No garden was immune to kids raiding it for a snack. We sucked on sour rhubarb stalks, and cringed at the bitterness of currents. We raided the ditches and gullies, picking raspberries and blackberries when we were lucky enough to find them. Each ripening carried back to the kitchens of our grannies where it was made into something wonderful.

 

Except pastry. I learned how not to make pastry from both of my Grandmothers. Kind of like how not to choose a mate. As it turns out, Granny Eileen  insisted that if I followed the recipe on the box of Tenderflake, my pastry would be just fine. She also lied. Years later my aunt laughted at me so hard tears streamed down her face; Granny used pre-made pastry and was full of shit. Granny Dorothy on the other hand was honest with me but produced pastry with a texture so fearsome that the dog wouldn’t even eat it.  From this I learned that sometimes we don’t always get what we need from family. Sometimes we have to reach out to become wiser and better.

 

The quiet stretches in my kitchen necessary for the process of preserving and canning gives me time to commune with the spirit of these two women. They are with me here in the steam and heat, and smell of cooked fruit. They are with me when I take a jar of something I preserved from the pantry and serve it to my family and friends. My grannies are always with me at my table.

 

 

 

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To-Do Lists; Faking it ‘Til You Make It

autumtodoBalance is hard to maintain.

I’ve tried pilates balls, running, meditation, hard work and hard partying.

Last night an old pal asked me what was on my Fall To-Do List. After I told him, it felt kind of mediocre. A little pathetic even. They were simple, fun things, with nothing that really deserved a blue ribbon or a mug shot on a trade magazine.

But those simple things do matter.  It’s the little things that string together moments which define a life.

Wandering off the beaten path at the McMichael gallery last week, a dear pal and I talked about the year we’ve had. When I discussed my summer and autumn to-do lists, his remark was a chuckle, “It’s like faking it ’til you make it“. And he was right.

Hardworking, intelligent, emotionally capable folks, (like moi) tend to be good at isolating themselves when they feel vulnerable. I have learned through experience just how important it is to call out for a lifeline and grab hold.

My friends have answered that call as best they can, given their own chaos and capabilities.

A relatively new pal suited up at the last-minute and humoured my desire to participate in Nuit Blanche. Others have shared coffee, baseball games, girl talks and gone shopping with me ( I hate shopping).

My seasonal to-do lists may seem forced, but so far so good. Each day my heart mends a bit more. 

 So far each item on my simple lists have provided me with connection to other wonderful human beings, and that my darlings, is what life is all about.